Who Has the Right to Complain?

With only a month and a half left in the semester, many students are really starting to feel the pressure from their course workloads. This can be from adjusting to college workloads if you’re a freshman; or if you’re in courses related to your major as a junior or senior. Either way, it’s getting tough and the question has arisen, who really has the right to complain?

Is it equal work?

Kevin Rask, an economics professor, told CBS news that STEM teachers tend to grade more rigorously, and this has caused for many STEM majors to average lower grade point averages. This can explain why some students who are STEM related majors feel that achieving a 3.5 or higher GPA as an arts or humanities major is not the same. It’s as if arts and humanities majors are always dealt the short-end of the stick, and made to feel their majors are not held on the same caliber as STEM majors.

The course work for nearly all majors will gradually get harder once a student transitions into classes focused solely on their major. By belittling how difficult ones classes are just off pretense of their major can come off as ignorant. Whether a student is a History or computer science major, each student will be tested and challenged.

No longer leaving out the arts.

“Art and design are definitely beneficial in engineering,” JaMon Patterson, a chemical engineering major at Clark, said. “Engineers have to create new ideas and concepts that are innovative. A lot of times that includes making models of your ideas, whether it’s digital 3D models or physical models. Having background in the arts or design would give an engineer the upper hand in creating the best concepts for people to see.”

As STEM is beginning to integrate with art and design to create STEAM, it’s clear that society feels you cannot have one without the other. Art, humanities, education and social sciences are just as pivotal to societal growth as science, technology, engineering and math.

The goals of the STEAM movement are to place art and design at the center of STEM, and to influence employers to hire artists and designers to drive innovation. It also hopes to integrate art and design into K-20 education.

Who works harder?

“I don’t think any one major works harder,” Monique White, a sophomore psychology major at Clark said. “I believe it depends on the person and how hard they actually want to work.”

It is no secret that engineering is the most difficult degree to earn, and according to Forbes it’s the most valuable as well. This is not to say that other degrees are not worthwhile. BuzzFeed, collegerag.net and outstandingcolleges.com all said that social sciences, liberal arts, humanities and education could be hard degrees to earn as well.

 

For STEM majors, most of the difficulty comes from the tedious work and the high level of accuracy that has to be achieved. On the other hand, liberal arts and humanities focus heavily on fact checking and writing skills. BuzzFeed estimated that, on average, 17 hours per week are spent on studying and school work between arts, humanities and STEM majors.

This means that, overall, both STEM and non-STEM majors use the same amount of time to keep up with their studies. There is no one major that study harder or longer than the other.

It gets hard for everyone.

“Everybody has a lot of work to do,” Emonnie Hilliard, an Education major at Clark Atlanta, said. “Whether you’re STEM or not, everyone is working towards achieving the same goal. Getting their degree.”

Ultimately, whether someone is a STEM major or an art history major will not determine how hard they have to work to earn their degree. All students go through rough times throughout their academic career. The major and career someone pursues will not come easy, and will be competitive regardless of what it is.

This competition is what drives students to work their hardest and earn their best grades. Hard work is just that, hard. So no matter what a person studies, they still have the right to complain when the going gets tough.

Irayah Cooper

Staff Writer

Irayah.cooper@students.cau.edu

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